Lotus Turbo Esprit Fact Respository for the 1981-1987 Lotus Turbo Esprit (the Giugiaro cars.)

Custom Lotus parts, guides and facts for the Lotus Turbo Esprit. 2.2 Liter Lotus engine with turbo. Guides for tires, wheels, engine, transmission as well as custom carbon fiber, aluminum and fiberglass parts for the Lotus Turbo Esprit. As well as an adjustable suspension for the front of the car.

Facts for both the US and UK Lotus Turbo Esprit, including spring rates, engine info, parts, modifications, specifications (specs), pictures, users, owners and vital information for the Lotus.

Some information might be valid for non turbo cars and other Esprits as well, some custom parts may be usable on non turbo version of the car and other parts may work on the later Esprits. And suspension adjustment and springs, coilovers coil overs and other stuff.

Turbo Esprits have the 2.2 liter lotus engine and 210 horsepower, we have custom fiberglass, aluminum and carbon fiber parts being developed along with a multitude of facts on the lotus cars.

We will have replacement OEM parts as well as custom unique parts for the esprits made from fiberglass, carbon fiber and aluminum.

We are interested in hearing from other lotus owners including S1 owners, S2 esprit owners and S3 n/a lotuses. We have a variety of owners.

Website designed by: DrieStone Design


TurbochargerTheory

Esprit.TurbochargerTheory History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to markup

July 12, 2006, at 07:24 PM by 65.75.19.170
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By outfitting your car with an electronic boost controller you can adjust your boost level from the driver's seat (you can easily run more boost at the track with a higher octane, or on colder days.) With some of the more intelligent boost controllers you can make your boost level RPM dependent (maybe 12 psi at 3000 RPM, but only 8 psi at 6000 RPM.)sss
to:
By outfitting your car with an electronic boost controller you can adjust your boost level from the driver's seat (you can easily run more boost at the track with a higher octane, or on colder days.) With some of the more intelligent boost controllers you can make your boost level RPM dependent (maybe 12 psi at 3000 RPM, but only 8 psi at 6000 RPM.)
July 12, 2006, at 07:23 PM by 65.75.19.170
Changed line 40 from:
By outfitting your car with an electronic boost controller you can adjust your boost level from the driver's seat (you can easily run more boost at the track with a higher octane, or on colder days.) With some of the more intelligent boost controllers you can make your boost level RPM dependent (maybe 12 psi at 3000 RPM, but only 8 psi at 6000 RPM.)
to:
By outfitting your car with an electronic boost controller you can adjust your boost level from the driver's seat (you can easily run more boost at the track with a higher octane, or on colder days.) With some of the more intelligent boost controllers you can make your boost level RPM dependent (maybe 12 psi at 3000 RPM, but only 8 psi at 6000 RPM.)sss
July 30, 2004, at 11:11 AM by 24.88.223.178
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March 21, 2004, at 08:25 PM by 66.212.205.166
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March 21, 2004, at 08:24 PM by 66.212.205.166
Changed lines 40-46 from:
By outfitting your car with an electronic boost controller you can adjust your boost level from the driver's seat (you can easily run more boost at the track with a higher octane, or on colder days.) With some of the more intelligent boost controllers you can make your boost level RPM dependent (maybe 12 psi at 3000 RPM, but only 8 psi at 6000 RPM.)


The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect

Attach:IC-Design.xls
to:
By outfitting your car with an electronic boost controller you can adjust your boost level from the driver's seat (you can easily run more boost at the track with a higher octane, or on colder days.) With some of the more intelligent boost controllers you can make your boost level RPM dependent (maybe 12 psi at 3000 RPM, but only 8 psi at 6000 RPM.)
March 21, 2004, at 08:24 PM by 66.212.205.166
Added lines 30-43:

Every turbo needs a wastegate

Because a turbo is a cyclic device (the more exhaust it gets the more air it can compress which makes even more exhaust), left unchecked it would create a huge amount of boost destroying your engine very quickly.

In order to keep the boost manageable there needs to be a way to limit the amount of exhaust gas that turns the turbine. This is what a wastegate does. The wastegate is a valve that opens at a particular pressure and allows exhaust gases to circumvent the turbo.

Wastegates are usually integrated with the turbo, but many applications use an external wastegate which is totally separate from the turbo (this is the setup on the Turbo Esprit.) Wastegates have a spring that is used to set the pressure that the wastegate will open at, therefore setting the "boost" of the turbo. The non-HCI Esprit's wastegate is set to 8psi.

If you have an interest in changing the pressure at which the wastegate opens you must either swap the wastegate spring, bleed of some boost so the wastegate only "sees" a percentage of the actual boost pressure or "hide" the pressure from the wastegate using a solenoid. The third method is the preferable way to adjust your boost (in fact a number of turbo charged cars are engineered from the factory to use this method.)

By outfitting your car with an electronic boost controller you can adjust your boost level from the driver's seat (you can easily run more boost at the track with a higher octane, or on colder days.) With some of the more intelligent boost controllers you can make your boost level RPM dependent (maybe 12 psi at 3000 RPM, but only 8 psi at 6000 RPM.)


March 21, 2004, at 07:42 PM by 66.212.205.166
Changed line 24 from:
When air is compressed so that more air can fit in the same volume, its temperature is increased. This is compounded by the fact that the turbocharger is not 100% efficient and generates heat when compressing the air. Since the air is hotter, it is less dense, which means less oxygen is in the cylinder than if the air were cooler. This explains why a 14.7 psi turbocharger gauge pressure will not double the power of an engine. The heat also explains why an engine under boost is more prone to knocking (predetonation or auto-detonation). In order to cool the charged air, an intercooler or water/alcohol injection is often used.
to:
When air is compressed so that more air can fit in the same volume, its temperature is increased. This is compounded by the fact that the turbocharger is not 100% efficient and generates heat when compressing the air. Since the air is hotter, it is less dense, which means less oxygen is in the cylinder than if the air were cooler. This explains why a 14.7 psi turbocharger gauge pressure will not double the power of an engine. The heat also explains why an engine under boost is more prone to knocking (predetonation or auto-detonation). In order to cool the charged air, an intercooler or water/alcohol injection is often used.
March 21, 2004, at 07:40 PM by 66.212.205.166
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March 21, 2004, at 07:39 PM by 66.212.205.166
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How Does It Work?

to:

How a Turbocharger Works (or: How Turbochargers Work)

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A turbo charger uses exiting exhaust gasses to turn a turbine connected to a compressor to pressurize air flowing into your engine.
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Usually integrated into the turbo, but on the Esprit a separate unit is the wastegate. The wastegate is a valve that "senses" pressure and opens at a certain pressure. When the wastegate opens, exhaust gases take an alternate path AROUND the turbo (so the turbo's "power supply" is reduced.)
to:
Turbochargers harness some of an engine's wasted energy to compress the air going into that engine - thereby increasing the output of the engine. Perhaps you can sense something cyclic about the previous sentence. That's because a turbocharger is by its very nature, cyclic. Use of a turbocharger can increase the output of an engine by 30 percent or more without a significant increase in the weight of the vehicle.
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Increasing Boost

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In a lot of setups there is a vacuum line running from the pressurized side of the turbo to an electrically controlled solenoid that then leads to the wastegate. This way an electronic device can open or close the wastegate (by hiding the actual boost level from the wastegate until the electronic device "opens" the solenoid.) The 3rd Generation Esprit DOES NOT have this setup and the wastegate is only activated by it's internal spring. If you want to change the boost level from the stock setup you must either replace the spring in the wastegate or "plumb" a solenoid (then purchase some kind of a boost controller.)
Deleted line 7:
Boost controllers can be everything from a simple valve that bleeds off some pressure so that the wastegate only sees a portion of the actual boost (this can be done with a fish tank valve,) to a complete fuzzy logic electronic boost controller. Either way, you need to make sure that your boost gauge is well marked and accurate.
Changed line 9 from:
The general consensus is that if your engine is stock, you shouldn't play with your boost. The internals of the engine just aren't set up to run more than MAYBE another pound of boost.
to:

The Turbocharger Turbine

Deleted line 10:
Remember that if you tweak the boost, you also need to retune your carbs. In an EFI car, the computer will make sure the engine has enough fuel, we don't have that luxury in the non HCI cars.
Changed line 12 from:
The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect
to:
At the end of combustion, as the piston is traveling back up the cylinder, the exhaust valve(s) opens and hot air is forced out of the cylinder. This exhaust is wasted in a naturally aspirated engine, simply being released into the atmosphere. A turbocharger, however, recycles this energy. In a turbocharged setup, the exhaust gases are forced through the turbine of the turbocharger. This causes the turbine wheel to spin.
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The Turbocharger Compressor

The turbine wheel is directly attached to another wheel in the compressor of the turbo. On this side of the turbo, often referred to as the compressor or the "cold" side, the spinning compressor wheel compresses the intake air. This pressurized air is then forced into the engine. Since pressurized air has more oxygen per unit volume (PV = nRT), there is more opportunity for combustion. This additional oxygen can either accompanied by additional fuel for increased power or in some diesel applications, the advantage is in the excess oxygen which allows for cleaner and more complete burning of the fuel, resulting in reduced emissions and increased efficiency.

Compression Generates Heat

When air is compressed so that more air can fit in the same volume, its temperature is increased. This is compounded by the fact that the turbocharger is not 100% efficient and generates heat when compressing the air. Since the air is hotter, it is less dense, which means less oxygen is in the cylinder than if the air were cooler. This explains why a 14.7 psi turbocharger gauge pressure will not double the power of an engine. The heat also explains why an engine under boost is more prone to knocking (predetonation or auto-detonation). In order to cool the charged air, an intercooler or water/alcohol injection is often used.

Original Page


The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect

Attach:IC-Design.xls
March 21, 2004, at 01:14 PM by 66.212.205.166
Changed lines 17-25 from:

Intercooler/Chargecooler

When air gets compressed, friction creates heat. A car running 15lbs of boost can easily have a 200 degree increase in temperature. Most turbocharged cars use an air to air intercooler to bring the temperature of the compressed air down. The compressed air flows through a intercooler (which is basically a radiator,) which uses the ambient air to cool down the compressed air before it enters the engine (hot air increases the chance for detonation.)

Since putting an intercooler in the air stream is difficult to do on a mid-engine car Lotus uses a liquid to cool the compressed air (Lotus calls this a chargecooler.) The liquid is pumped in a closed loop from the front (where there is a radiator,) to the engine bay where it passes through the intercooler then back to the front.

The performance gain that we would achieve on a stock engine by running slightly higher boost and plumbing a liquid to air intercooler would be minimal. Although the increased boost will provide additional torque, the chargecooler's pump would need a good portion of our newly acquired power to operate. In effect we would cancel out most of the power we could gain from such a system.

The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect
to:
The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect
Deleted line 19:

March 19, 2004, at 11:46 AM by 209.54.72.52
Deleted lines 28-32:

Bottom Line

The Early Esprits are not detuned machines like a lot of today's cars. There is very little performance tweaking you can do to a stock engine to increase horsepower. If you are on a quest for power you have two choices:
1) Rebuild your engine with performance internals and then increase boost.
2) Transplant a 90's EFI engine into your car and plumb an intercooler (for increased boost.)
March 19, 2004, at 11:45 AM by 209.54.72.52
Changed line 19 from:
When air gets compressed, friction creates heat. A car running 15lbs of boost can easily have a 200 degree increase in temperature. Most turbocharged cars use an air to air intercooler to bring the temperature of the compressed air down. Basically the compressed air flows through a radiator which uses the ambient air to cool down the compressed air before it enters the engine (hot air increases the chance for detonation, the cooler the air the better for your engine.)
to:
When air gets compressed, friction creates heat. A car running 15lbs of boost can easily have a 200 degree increase in temperature. Most turbocharged cars use an air to air intercooler to bring the temperature of the compressed air down. The compressed air flows through a intercooler (which is basically a radiator,) which uses the ambient air to cool down the compressed air before it enters the engine (hot air increases the chance for detonation.)
Changed line 21 from:
Since putting an intercooler in the air stream is harder on a mid-engine car Lotus uses a liquid to cool the compressed air (Lotus calls this a chargecooler.) The liquid is pumped in a closed loop from the front (where there is a radiator,) to the engine bay where it passes through the intercooler then back to the front.
to:
Since putting an intercooler in the air stream is difficult to do on a mid-engine car Lotus uses a liquid to cool the compressed air (Lotus calls this a chargecooler.) The liquid is pumped in a closed loop from the front (where there is a radiator,) to the engine bay where it passes through the intercooler then back to the front.
Changed lines 23-35 from:
A more detailed explanation may be required---correct for normal driving, however under high boost conditions arent intercoolers a proven advantage

True, it's vital that you run some kind of IC at higher boost, but the bottom line is that no matter how much you cool the air, a stock engine on an Esprit isn't set up to run more than the 8psi boost. If you took the time and energy to build a liquid to air intercooler setup I think the pump used to move the liquid would probably steal the minimal amount of power that you'd be able to gain by cooling the air and increasing the boost.

Now if we could figure out a clever way to run an air-to-air intercooler I think that might be worth it (and a hell of a lot simpler to pumb.)

Perhaps the following paragraph should read:

The performance gain that we would achieve on a stock engine by running slightly higher boost and plumbing a liquid to air intercooler. Would be canceled out by the draw that the required pump would steal from the system. In all, unless the internals of the engine are strengthened, there is no reason to build any kind of a liquid to air cooling system.

Jon

It may sound like we can run more boost if we plumb a liquid to air intercooler. Although this is probably true, we wouldn't see much performace gain. Again, the general consensus is that running any kind of intercooler setup is a lot of work for very little gain.
to:
The performance gain that we would achieve on a stock engine by running slightly higher boost and plumbing a liquid to air intercooler would be minimal. Although the increased boost will provide additional torque, the chargecooler's pump would need a good portion of our newly acquired power to operate. In effect we would cancel out most of the power we could gain from such a system.
March 18, 2004, at 06:50 PM by 66.212.205.166
Changed lines 23-35 from:
A more detailed explanation may be required---correct for normal driving, however under high boost conditions arent intercoolers a proven advantage It may sound like we can run more boost if we plumb a liquid to air intercooler. Although this is probably true, we wouldn't see much performace gain. Again, the general consensus is that running any kind of intercooler setup is a lot of work for very little gain.
to:
A more detailed explanation may be required---correct for normal driving, however under high boost conditions arent intercoolers a proven advantage

True, it's vital that you run some kind of IC at higher boost, but the bottom line is that no matter how much you cool the air, a stock engine on an Esprit isn't set up to run more than the 8psi boost. If you took the time and energy to build a liquid to air intercooler setup I think the pump used to move the liquid would probably steal the minimal amount of power that you'd be able to gain by cooling the air and increasing the boost.

Now if we could figure out a clever way to run an air-to-air intercooler I think that might be worth it (and a hell of a lot simpler to pumb.)

Perhaps the following paragraph should read:

The performance gain that we would achieve on a stock engine by running slightly higher boost and plumbing a liquid to air intercooler. Would be canceled out by the draw that the required pump would steal from the system. In all, unless the internals of the engine are strengthened, there is no reason to build any kind of a liquid to air cooling system.

Jon

It may sound like we can run more boost if we plumb a liquid to air intercooler. Although this is probably true, we wouldn't see much performace gain. Again, the general consensus is that running any kind of intercooler setup is a lot of work for very little gain.
Changed lines 43-45 from:
The Early Esprits are not detuned machines like a lot of today's cars. There is very little performance tweaking you can do to a stock engine to increase horsepower. If you are on a quest for power you have two choices: 1) Rebuild your engine with performance internals and then increase boost, 2) Transplant a 90's EFI engine into your car and plumb an intercooler (and increase boost.)
to:
The Early Esprits are not detuned machines like a lot of today's cars. There is very little performance tweaking you can do to a stock engine to increase horsepower. If you are on a quest for power you have two choices:
1) Rebuild your engine with performance internals and then increase boost.
2) Transplant a 90's EFI engine into your car and plumb an intercooler (for increased boost.)
March 18, 2004, at 06:23 PM by 24.68.48.217
Changed line 25 from:
The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model, it is intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect
to:
The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect
March 18, 2004, at 06:22 PM by 24.68.48.217
Added lines 25-26:
The attached spreadsheet is a steady state model, it is intended to provide an insight into the effects of chargecooling on an engine. As you can see, it has been approximated for an Esprit engine using a lotus type water/air intercooler. The specifications shown for the intercooler have not been taken from actual measurements but are an approximation based on visual estimates. Play with the numbers and see for yourself what you can expect

Added line 28:

March 18, 2004, at 06:11 PM by 24.68.48.217
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Attach:icdesign.xls?
to:
March 18, 2004, at 06:11 PM by 24.68.48.217
Added line 25:
Attach:icdesign.xls?
March 18, 2004, at 06:01 PM by 24.68.48.217
Changed line 23 from:
It may sound like we can run more boost if we plumb a liquid to air intercooler. Although this is probably true, we wouldn't see much performace gain. Again, the general consensus is that running any kind of intercooler setup is a lot of work for very little gain.
to:
A more detailed explanation may be required---correct for normal driving, however under high boost conditions arent intercoolers a proven advantage It may sound like we can run more boost if we plumb a liquid to air intercooler. Although this is probably true, we wouldn't see much performace gain. Again, the general consensus is that running any kind of intercooler setup is a lot of work for very little gain.
March 17, 2004, at 07:27 PM by 24.68.48.217
Deleted line 7:
Attach:porsche.jpg?
March 17, 2004, at 07:26 PM by 24.68.48.217
Added line 9:

March 17, 2004, at 07:26 PM by 24.68.48.217
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to:
Attach:porsche.jpg?
March 17, 2004, at 01:24 AM by 66.212.205.166
Changed line 19 from:
What Lotus calls a chargecooler is a liquid to air intercooler. When air compresses friction creates heat. A car running 15lbs of boost can easily have a 200 degree increase in temperature. Most turbocharged cars use an air to air intercooler. Basically the compressed air flows through a radiator which uses the ambient air to cool down the compressed air before it enters the engine (hot air increases the chance for detonation, the cooler the air the better for your engine.)
to:
When air gets compressed, friction creates heat. A car running 15lbs of boost can easily have a 200 degree increase in temperature. Most turbocharged cars use an air to air intercooler to bring the temperature of the compressed air down. Basically the compressed air flows through a radiator which uses the ambient air to cool down the compressed air before it enters the engine (hot air increases the chance for detonation, the cooler the air the better for your engine.)
Changed line 21 from:
Since putting an intercooler in the air stream is harder on a mid-engine car Lotus uses a liquid to cool the compressed air. The liquid is pumped in a closed loop from the front (where there is a radiator,) to the engine bay where it passes through the intercooler.
to:
Since putting an intercooler in the air stream is harder on a mid-engine car Lotus uses a liquid to cool the compressed air (Lotus calls this a chargecooler.) The liquid is pumped in a closed loop from the front (where there is a radiator,) to the engine bay where it passes through the intercooler then back to the front.
March 17, 2004, at 01:21 AM by 66.212.205.166
Changed line 27 from:
The Early Esprits are not detuned machines like a lot of todays cars. There is very little performance tweaking you can do to a stock engine to increase horsepower. If you are on a quest for power you will have to do a lot of work before you can install that boost controller and bump the boost up. You have two choices: 1) Rebuild your engine with performance internals (you might be able to run 10-11 lbs. of boost, 2) Transplant a 90's EFI engine into your car and plumb an intercooler.
to:
The Early Esprits are not detuned machines like a lot of today's cars. There is very little performance tweaking you can do to a stock engine to increase horsepower. If you are on a quest for power you have two choices: 1) Rebuild your engine with performance internals and then increase boost, 2) Transplant a 90's EFI engine into your car and plumb an intercooler (and increase boost.)
March 17, 2004, at 01:20 AM by 66.212.205.166
Changed line 9 from:
In a lot of setups there is a vacuum line running from the pressurized side of the turbo to an electrically controlled valve that then leads to the wastegate. This way an electronic device can open or close the wastegate (by hiding the actual boost level from the wastegate until the electronic device "opens" the valve.) The 3rd Generation Esprit DOES NOT have this setup and the wastegate is only activated by it's internal spring. If you want to change the boost level from the stock setup you must either replace the spring in the wastegate or "plumb" a switch (then purchase some kind of a boost controller.)
to:
In a lot of setups there is a vacuum line running from the pressurized side of the turbo to an electrically controlled solenoid that then leads to the wastegate. This way an electronic device can open or close the wastegate (by hiding the actual boost level from the wastegate until the electronic device "opens" the solenoid.) The 3rd Generation Esprit DOES NOT have this setup and the wastegate is only activated by it's internal spring. If you want to change the boost level from the stock setup you must either replace the spring in the wastegate or "plumb" a solenoid (then purchase some kind of a boost controller.)
Changed lines 11-27 from:
The general consensus is that if your engine is stock, you shouldn't play with your boost. The internals of the engine just aren't set up to run more boost.
to:
Boost controllers can be everything from a simple valve that bleeds off some pressure so that the wastegate only sees a portion of the actual boost (this can be done with a fish tank valve,) to a complete fuzzy logic electronic boost controller. Either way, you need to make sure that your boost gauge is well marked and accurate.

The general consensus is that if your engine is stock, you shouldn't play with your boost. The internals of the engine just aren't set up to run more than MAYBE another pound of boost.

Remember that if you tweak the boost, you also need to retune your carbs. In an EFI car, the computer will make sure the engine has enough fuel, we don't have that luxury in the non HCI cars.

Intercooler/Chargecooler

What Lotus calls a chargecooler is a liquid to air intercooler. When air compresses friction creates heat. A car running 15lbs of boost can easily have a 200 degree increase in temperature. Most turbocharged cars use an air to air intercooler. Basically the compressed air flows through a radiator which uses the ambient air to cool down the compressed air before it enters the engine (hot air increases the chance for detonation, the cooler the air the better for your engine.)

Since putting an intercooler in the air stream is harder on a mid-engine car Lotus uses a liquid to cool the compressed air. The liquid is pumped in a closed loop from the front (where there is a radiator,) to the engine bay where it passes through the intercooler.

It may sound like we can run more boost if we plumb a liquid to air intercooler. Although this is probably true, we wouldn't see much performace gain. Again, the general consensus is that running any kind of intercooler setup is a lot of work for very little gain.

Bottom Line

The Early Esprits are not detuned machines like a lot of todays cars. There is very little performance tweaking you can do to a stock engine to increase horsepower. If you are on a quest for power you will have to do a lot of work before you can install that boost controller and bump the boost up. You have two choices: 1) Rebuild your engine with performance internals (you might be able to run 10-11 lbs. of boost, 2) Transplant a 90's EFI engine into your car and plumb an intercooler.
March 16, 2004, at 08:42 PM by 66.212.205.166
Changed lines 1-11 from:
Describe TurboCharger? here.
to:

How Does It Work?

A turbo charger uses exiting exhaust gasses to turn a turbine connected to a compressor to pressurize air flowing into your engine.

Usually integrated into the turbo, but on the Esprit a separate unit is the wastegate. The wastegate is a valve that "senses" pressure and opens at a certain pressure. When the wastegate opens, exhaust gases take an alternate path AROUND the turbo (so the turbo's "power supply" is reduced.)

Increasing Boost

In a lot of setups there is a vacuum line running from the pressurized side of the turbo to an electrically controlled valve that then leads to the wastegate. This way an electronic device can open or close the wastegate (by hiding the actual boost level from the wastegate until the electronic device "opens" the valve.) The 3rd Generation Esprit DOES NOT have this setup and the wastegate is only activated by it's internal spring. If you want to change the boost level from the stock setup you must either replace the spring in the wastegate or "plumb" a switch (then purchase some kind of a boost controller.)

The general consensus is that if your engine is stock, you shouldn't play with your boost. The internals of the engine just aren't set up to run more boost.
Page last modified on July 12, 2006, at 07:24 PM